car accident minnesota today
car accident minnesota today
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car accident minnesota today

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Five people suffered non-life-threatening injuries in a crash between a car and school bus in Bagley Minnesota Friday afternoon according to the state patrol driver 33 year old megan reed of Cloquet was westbound on highway two when a school bus driven by 58 year old feller II Larson of Bagley pulled out on the highway and they collided Megan Reed and her passengers a 39 year old Adam Reed baby Adelaide Reed and 2 year-old Mason Reed all suffered non-life-threatening injuries and were transferred to Sanford and Bagley bus driver of fell ray Larson also suffered non-life-threatening injuries and was also transported transported to Sanford and Bagley everyone was buckled in and alcohol was not a factor in the crash according to the State Patrol I'm Neil Carlson reporting for I news dot TV

FAQ

How did you cope after causing your first car accident?
At the age of 17, a friend and I skipped school and spent the day hanging out, having a few beers earlier. This is all in the late 70’s early 80’s when people were just beginning to think about the negative impact of DUI and especially, teens drinking. The legal age was 18, so for a 17 year-old, buying a six pack of beer was not even a thing that would cause a convenience store clerk to ask for an ID.Okay, so we’ve established that I was a heathen, skipping school and drinking beer. But back then, none of this was anything that people even gave a second thought about, at least not in my town.It had been several hours since my buddy and I killed the six-pack, but by any honest evaluation, I had at least the minor affect of having had three beers that day. When school was finishing up, I drove my buddy back to the school so he could pick up his car which he had left in the student lot.On our way, an afternoon shower began causing the roads to become slick. I approached a sharp turn and as I made this turn I had taken several times a day, and often in wet conditions, I suspect my speed was at least above what it should have been. I turned the wheel, but the car did not respond and instead, my driver’s side crossed over the double yellow line causing me to hit an oncoming car, who was also slightly over the line.We were both stopped in the middle of a blind curve which meant that we could have been hit by traffic coming from either direction. I was able to reverse my car out of the collision and pull to the side of the road before my buddy and I jumped out of the car, acting on pure adrenaline, to get to the other car and check for injuries.Thankfully, everyone was somewhat okay. The driver of the other vehicle did have a knee injury that got her a nice settlement from my insurance company, and of course, she deserved that settlement. No complaints from me or my parents.A neighbor who lived on that corner heard the ruckus and called the sheriff, who arrived in a few minutes. He asked everyone what happened, got the statements, saw to it that two trucks hauled away both our vehicles and then got the spouse of the other driver to come get his wife.This is all before mobile phones. No pictures of the scene, and no way to call my parents. The officer gave my friend and me a ride back to my house and dropped us off. That whole thing about having had several beers earlier in the day? Never even came up. When I got home, I borrowed my mom’s car and took my friend to the school to get his car. Nobody even wondered if we had skipped school.I think about that incident today, some 40 years later and realize just how much of an impact it could have had on my life. In fact, by today’s standards in the US, a teen who had been involved in a similar incident would have never been allowed to enlist in the military. Surely, the sheriff of today would have been more keen to the fact that I may have been impaired which would have changed the opportunity to enter my chosen career.The final and most important thing I remember about my first car accident was the reaction of my father. When he came home from work he and I drove up to the lot where my car had been taken. It was a horrifying mess. I thought for sure that he would be mad and ground me. Instead, he simply said, “I’m so glad you are okay.”This response would shape me as a father in the way that I handled the inevitable car crashes my own kids were involved with, and the many other situations that some fathers might not handle as gracefully.
If I've never let my car run out of gas, how much gas from the first time it was filled up is still in the tank today?
Virtually none. One of the MINOR effects observed in gasoline tanks is that gas EXHALES, or out-gases, the volatiles, contained in it’s mixture. The longer it remains in your tank, the more light weight volatiles it loses, and the more it drops to the bottom of a static tank, where the pickup port is located.Of course, gasoline tanks on cars, are not static at all. They start, stop, and slosh quite a bit, and mix the tank pretty thoroughly. Many gas tanks for race cars, for instance, have internal baffles to prevent the center of gravity of the car, shifting violently as the car goes around a corner, inducing g on the fuel.
Do I have to fill out a accident report request that was sent to me? There wasn't damage to either of our cars
This depends on which state you live in and also who sent you the report request. It is highly unusual for a citizen to send a crash report to another citizen. If I were you I would not fill it out unless it came from a police agency. Even then I would be suspicious and follow Kathryn's answer below.
How common were car accidents in the 1930s compared to today?
We’d need to have a look at some statistics to know. I was only able to dig up statistics for the United States: List of motor vehicle deaths in U.S. by yearThis statistics doesn’t record the total number of accidents, just the fatalities. Perhaps a bit surprisingly for someone, the car travel was a dangerous business in 1930’s. In the year 1930, there were 31,204 total fatalities, that is 15.12 per billion vehicle miles traveled, or 25.353 per 100,000 population.In 2013 - the last year covered by the wiki page - there were 32,719 fatalities, or 1.1 per billion vehicle miles traveled, or 10.345 per 100,000 population.The most telling measure, in my opinion, is the number of fatalities per billion vehicle miles traveled. By this measure, the traffic was 15 times as dangerous in 1930 as it is today, despite the traffic being much less intense. I’d say these are the most important factors (but I might have missed some):Cars are much safer now than in 1930 - seatbelts, airbags, deformation zones, ABS and other driving assistants all make a huge difference.Traumatic health care has improved significantly.We now have a dedicated system to quickly help car accident victims (firefighters with special equipment, helicopters to move injured to hospital quickly, etc.).The streets themselves are safer, being built with better knowledge of risks involved in car traffic. Especially highways allow to travel long distances relatively safely.But to answer the direct question: given that traveling the same distance resulted in 15 times higher probability of death in 1930 than today, I’d say we can conclude that accidents were quite common - for those folks who actually traveled in a car back then.
There is curfew in my area and Internet service is blocked, how can I fill my exam form as today is the last day to fill it out?
Spend less time using your blocked Internet to ask questions on Quora, andTravel back in time to when there was no curfew and you were playing Super Mario Kart, and instead, fill out your exam form.
How do you fill out a car accidet release form, and what purpose does it serve?
If this is a release given to you by the insurance company, it is a contract regarding your settlement. You are agreeing to accept a stated amount of money in exchange for releasing all claims arising out of the accident. After you sign the release and send it back to the insurance company, they will send you a check for the stated amount. The release ends the claim.If that is not what you meant, or if you have other detailed questions, please elaborate.
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